Fribourg and Treyer, of blessed memory                       Back to Contents

This site has been rescued for historical reasons by History X's archive to help keep snuff alive.

The Fribourg & Treyer label looked somewhat like this:

Fribourg and Treyer Label

An earlier label showing the Rasp and Crown:

:
Old Fribourg and Treyer Label





They had a beautiful shop with bow windows at the upper end of the Haymarket:

Fribourg and Treyer's Bow Windows in the Haymarket

and other shops in the Burlington Arcade, Oxford, and Cambridge.

They were pipe & tobacco specialists as well as Britain's premier snuff chandler.

My first encounter was when I went up to Oxford as a graduate in 1951.  Entering their lovely shop at 130 High St I asked the little man in charge "Do you sell snuff by the quarter ounce?".  Drawing himself up to his full height (nearly 4 feet) he glared up at me "Sir, this is a snuff shop!  We sell snuff, not dust beaten up from the carpet.  This University is going to the dogs!"   I hesitantly explained that I wanted to test & try a variety of snuffs, rather than risk all of my few coppers on only one.  "Test and try as many as you like"  he said, opening up the boxes on display one after another .  I will not say we became friends, but I think he thought of himself as my mentor on many subsequent visits when he would authoritatively expand on the character & virtues of the various snuffs.

He must be dead now; as is Fribourg and Treyer.

Ironically, John Arlott (1974) ends his book by saying of Fribourg & Treyer "one of its traditions ... is sheer business acumen...   A survival such as that of Fribourg and Treyer in the jungle of mercantile London can never be fortuitous"

It was bought by Imperial Tobacco, which apparently could not afford to renew the lease on the Haymarket premises, and after briefly moving it to Regent Street closed it down.

At least, Imperial Tobacco sold the F & T snuff-making recipes to Wilsons of Sharrow who still make its excellent Bordeaux snuff.


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This site has been rescued for historical reasons by History X's archive to help keep snuff alive.